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Law Enforcement / Police Foundations Diploma

The Law Enforcement and Police Foundations program at the National Academy of Health and Business is designed to prepare students to apply to and work as a police officer, customs official, immigrations officer, private security guard, private investigator, court office, fraud investigator and more.

The academy, alongside the instructor, who is a 30 year veteran of the Peel Police Force, will assist students on an individual basis to ensure they progress properly and are able to find the career of their choice.

The Law Enforcement and Police Foundations program is a joint initiative between the Police Learning System Advisory Committee and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities to establish minimum entrance standards for police services in Ontario.

We our one of few colleges to include fire arms and self-defense training, two essential skills you need to succeed in a career in law enforcement.

Be job ready in only nine months, not two years like at a community college!

The following breakdown presents you with all of the subject descriptions, theory and skill objectives, content outlines and length of programs that you’ll be studying.

The relative value of each unit will be based on approximately 50% practically related skills and 50% theoretical knowledge.

Teaching methods include lecture, hands-on skill building, demonstration and practice. At the conclusion of each topic each student will be evaluated on his/her theoretical knowledge and practical applications.

A thorough evaluation will be conducted at the conclusion of each individual module.

Module I

1. Introduction to Police Foundations

This section will introduce the student to law enforcement and the criminal justice system. They will also understand the duties and responsibilities of police administrations, services and agencies.

Subjects include:

  • Police terminology
  • The history, role and function of policing in Canada
  • Corrections
  • Contemporary issues
  • Police administrations, services and agencies

2.  Criminology

This section will introduce the student to the study of criminology and the role of law enforcement. The student will be able to define and understand the concepts of burden of proof and standard of proof.

Subjects include:

  • Criminology
  • Criminal justice
  • Law enforcement
  • Community Based Policing

3.  Hierarchy of Laws and the Canadian Constitution

This section will introduce the student to the structure and content of the Canadian Constitution in order to understand how laws are made. The relationship of the hierarchical structure that relates to specific offenses holds practical applications for law enforcement.

Subjects include:

  • The Canadian Constitution – An Overview
  • How laws are made
  • Structure, function and powers of the federal, provincial and municipal governments

4.  Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms/Law and The Criminal Code

This section will examine the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms with specific focus on the protection of human rights as they relate to law enforcement.

Subjects include:

  • Study of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  • Case Study
  • Law and the Criminal Code
  • Interpretation of the Criminal Code
  • Criminal and Civil Law

5.  Laws of Evidence

This section will introduce the student to the laws of evidence required to prove an offense. The student will be able to distinguish various types of evidence and examine the admissibility of each. At the end of this session the student will be able to explain the role of evidence law and the roles of the judge, jury and counsel with respect to the evidence.

Subjects include:

  • Laws of Evidence
  • Disclosure Obligation
  • Corroborative Evidence
  • Admissibility of Evidence
  • Physical and Documentary Evidence
  • Oral evidence and witnesses

6.  Elements of Offences

This section will introduce the student to specific elements of offenses and the role of case law. The student will study the differences in offenses to persons, property and the public.

Subjects include:

  • Elements
  • Offenses against persons, property, public order
  • Proving the offense
  • Criminal offenses
  • Domestic violence
  • Facts in Issue
  • Hate Crimes/Ethnic Diversity

7.  The Criminal Code, Federal and Provincial Statutes

This session will introduce the student to the Canadian Criminal Code and Federal and Provincial Statutes. At the end of this session the student will be able to interpret the Criminal Code and understand the theories of civil law, prosecution and defense as they relate to properly obtained evidence.

Subjects include:

  • The Criminal Code
  • Federal and Provincial Statutes
  • Theory of Civil Law
  • Examination vs. Cross Examination Theory of Prosecution Theory of Defense

8.  Prejudice Hearsay and Privilege

This section will examine how prejudice, hearsay and privilege affect the outcome of law enforcement and the probative value of evidence.

Subjects include:

  • Prejudice
  • Hearsay, privilege
  • Improperly obtained evidence
  • Probative value of evidence
  • Case study

9.  Young Offenders

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the Young Offenders Act and Child and Family Services Act in order to discuss and analyze current relevant issues as they relate to law enforcement.

Subjects include:

  • The Young Offenders Act Historical Overview
  • Child and Family Services Act Sentencing and Corrections
  • Alternative Measures

10.     Written and Verbal Communications

At the end of this session the student will be able to communicate accurately, persuasively and credibly with individuals, groups and multi-disciplinary teams. The student will also be able to demonstrate the ability to apply and practice professional business and legal writing skills.

Subjects include:

  • Theories of communication
  • Effective English and listening skills
  • Making effective presentations
  • Interviewing for investigation
  • Written communications
  • Business and legal writing skills
  • Maintaining an accurate diary

11.     Psychology

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of psychology and how it affects behavior, implement team-building methods and develop a practical approach to dealing with difficult behavior.

Subjects include:

  • Psychology
  • Factors affecting human behavior
  • Cognition, perception and motivation
  • Team building
  • Interpersonal relationships
  • Theories of criminal and deviant behavior

12.     First-term Examinations

  • Written theory examination
  • Written practical examination
  • Skills evaluations through case studies

Module II

13.     Sociology and Ethics

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate and practice occupational and professional ethics and understand social issues by demonstrating sensitivity to cultural differences.

  • Theory of social behavior
  • Types of functions of social services
  • Community programs
  • Issues in diversity
  • History of race, ethnic relations in Canada concepts of culture, ethnicity and race
  • Crisis Intervention
  • Ontario Human Rights Code

14.     Principles of Ethical Reasoning

At the end of this session the student will be able to apply ethical reasoning ability to their personal and professional decision-making process.

Subjects include:

  • Principles of ethical reasoning
  • Basis of moral reasoning and ethical behavior
  • Occupational and professional ethics

15.     Criminal statistics and trends

At the end of this session the students will understand how to read and analyze criminal statistics and trends. The student will demonstrate the ability to collect evidence while respecting the rights of the witness.

Subjects include:

  • Criminal statistics and trends
  • Psychological and social impact of crime and violence
  • Legal rights of the witnesses and of the accused
  • Respecting Rights in the Collection of Evidence
  • Search warrants and wire taps

16.     Public Administration

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate the ability to understand and apply theories of public administration and public sector management.

Subjects include:

  • Theory of public administration
  • Theory of public sector management
  • Public administration and the political process

17.     Acts and Regulations – Offenses

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of the acts and regulations that create offenses and how they relate to law enforcement.

Subjects include:

  • Controlled Drug and Substance Act Young offenders Act
  • Provincial Offences Act Highway Traffic Act
  • Compulsory Automobile Insurance Act
  • Trespass to Property Act
  • Liquor License Act & Regulations

18.     Acts and Regulations Administrative

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of the acts and regulations that are administrative in nature and the role of law enforcement.

Subjects include:

  • Police Services Act
  • Mental Health Act
  • Tenant Protection Act
  • Coroners Act
  • Child and Family Services Act

19.     First Nations People

At the end of this session the student will be able to understand social issues related to First Nations People and demonstrate sensitivity to cultural differences and laws.

Subjects include:

  • Laws, demographics, culture and current issues
  • Ethnic composition and the history of race relations in Canada
  • Culture and sensitivity training
  • Racially motivated conflict
  • First nations policing, use of force, law and legal issues
  • History, sovereignty, land titles, cultural history, current issues

20.     Police Procedures

This section has been designed to introduce the student to basic police procedures and prepare them to be able to promote and facilitate partnerships within the community. At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate the ability to exercise officer safety in use of force training. The student will also demonstrate the ability to manage traffic and understand traffic law and issues, affect an arrest, issue a warrant, interview witnesses, obtain evidence, maintain a diary, conduct an investigation and maintain a personal fitness program.

Subjects include:

  • Basic police procedures
  • Officer safety and use of force training
  • Community Based Policing
  • Fitness
  • Powers of arrest, arrest authorities
  • Search and seizure authorities
  • Warrants
  • Interviews, statements and confessions
  • Police discretion – implications
  • Police governance and accountability
  • Disclosure obligations to the public
  • Police management and labour relations
  • Police Services Board
  • Police complaints
  • Interviewing and investigation
  • Legal issues in investigation
  • Observation and listening skills
  • Maintaining a diary

Module 3 – Candidate Selection Preparatory Module

21.     Community Policing

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of community based policing and facilitate partnerships within the community.

Subjects include:

  • Theory of community policing
  • Models of community policing
  • Public relations
  • Alternative dispute resolution strategies
  • Community involvement in dispute resolution
  • Crime prevention strategies
  • Volunteerism

22.     Conducting an Investigation

At the end of this session the student will be able to collect and preserve evidence and demonstrate a working knowledge of rules and evidence.

Subjects include:

  • The preservation, collection and continuity of physical evidence
  • Evidentiary value
  • Investigation of death
  • Forensic evidence

23.     Lifestyle and Stress Management

At the end of this session the student will be able to maintain a personal fitness program, demonstrate problem solving and conflict management skills, understand and follow standards of occupational health and safety issues, and demonstrate team building skills in group dynamics.

Subjects include:

  • Stress management
  • Lifestyle management
  • Substance abuse
  • Nutrition

24.     Occupational Health and Safety/Tactical Communication

  • Occupational health and safety
  • WHMIS
  • Team building
  • Dealing with aggression
  • Conflict management
  • Theory of tactical communication
  • Mediation
  • Conflict resolution
  • Interpersonal and group dynamics

25.     Traffic Control

At the end of this session the student will be able to demonstrate the ability to manage traffic and understand traffic law and issues.

Subjects include:

  • Highway Traffic Act and Accident Investigation Traffic law enforcement
  • Public relations
  • Crowd control
  • Traffic management
  • Traffic law and issues

26.     Final Examinations

  • Written theory examination
  • Written practical examination
  • Practical skills evaluation
  • Final interview

27.     Job Preparation and Preparation for the Standardized Police Examination

At the end of this session the student will be prepared to write the Standardized Police examination as approved by the Police Learning System Advisory Committee. The candidate will be prepared with a professional resume and interviewing skills.

Subjects include:

  • Preparing a Resume
  • Interviewing techniques

28.     Practical Placement

During the on-the-job practical work placement, the student will be required to participate in a volunteer community based project focusing on one or more of the above modules.

Funding Options

The Law Enforcement / Police Foundations program is eligible for up to five different funding options, including the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP), Employment Insurance, Second Career Payment Plans and even loans facilitated by us.